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ABOUT US

Buyinsulinonline.org is a Canadian prescription referral service specializing in sourcing, dispensing and shipping of insulin and other temperature sensitive medications to patients in the US and Canada.

Our offices and licensed pharmacy are located in Winnipeg, Manitoba in central Canada. All medications dispensed are sourced from the same manufacturers of the products sold in the USA, and are approved by the Canadian government.

Buyinsulinonline.org helps Americans save up to 60% on insulin and other diabetes medications.Simply send us your prescription and have us take care of the rest.Call today for more details.

WHAT IS INSULIN

Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that allows your body to use sugar (glucose) from carbohydrates in the food that you eat for energy or to store glucose for future use. Insulin helps keeps your blood sugar level from getting too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia).

The cells in your body need sugar for energy. However, sugar cannot go into most of your cells directly. After you eat food and your blood sugar level rises, cells in your pancreas (known as beta cells) are signaled to release insulin into your bloodstream. Insulin then attaches to and signals cells to absorb sugar from the bloodstream. Insulin is often described as a “key,” which unlocks the cell to allow sugar to enter the cell and be used for energy.

Insulin Basics

  • There are different types of insulin depending on how quickly they work, when they peak, and how long they last.
  • Insulin is available in different strengths; the most common is U-100.
  • All insulin available in the United States is manufactured in a laboratory, but animal insulin can still be imported for personal use.

Inside the pancreas, the hormone insulin is made in the beta cells, which are part of the Islets of Langerhans. These islets also have alpha cells, which make glucagon, as well as delta cells. With each meal, beta cells release insulin to help the body use or store the blood sugar it gets from food.

Essential for life, the hormone insulin regulates many metabolic processes that provide cells with needed energy. Understanding insulin, what insulin does, and how it affects the body, is important to your overall health.

Tucked away behind the stomach is an organ called the pancreas, which produces insulin. Insulin production is regulated based on blood sugar levels and other hormones in the body. In a healthy individual, insulin production and release is a tightly regulated process, allowing the body to balance its metabolic needs.

What causes insulin resistance and prediabetes?

Researchers don’t fully understand what causes insulin resistance and prediabetes, but they think excess weight and lack of physical activity are major factors.

Excess weight

Experts believe obesity, especially too much fat in the abdomen and around the organs, called visceral fat, is a main cause of insulin resistance. A waist measurement of 40 inches or more for men and 35 inches or more for women is linked to insulin resistance. This is true even if your body mass index (BMI) falls within the normal range. However, research has shown that Asian Americans may have an increased risk for insulin resistance even without a high BMI.

Researchers used to think that fat tissue was only for energy storage. However, studies have shown that belly fat makes hormones and other substances that can contribute to chronic, or long-lasting, inflammation in the body. Inflammation may play a role in insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Excess weight may lead to insulin resistance, which in turn may play a part in the development of fatty liver disease.

How should this medicine be used?

Insulin comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to be injected subcutaneously (under the skin). Insulin is usually injected several times a day, and more than one type of insulin may be needed. Your doctor will tell you which type(s) of insulin to use, how much insulin to use, and how often to inject insulin. Follow these directions carefully. Do not use more or less insulin or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Insulin controls high blood sugar but does not cure diabetes. Continue to use insulin even if you feel well. Do not stop using insulin without talking to your doctor. Do not switch to another brand or type of insulin or change the dose of any type of insulin you use without talking to your doctor.

Insulin comes in vials, prefilled disposable dosing devices, and cartridges. The cartridges are designed to be placed in dosing pens. Be sure you know what type of container your insulin comes in and what other supplies, such as needles, syringes, or pens, you will need to inject your medication. Make sure that the name and letter on your insulin are exactly what your doctor prescribed.

If your insulin comes in vials, you will need to use syringes to inject your dose. Be sure that you know whether your insulin is U-100 or U-500 and always use a syringe marked for that type of insulin. Always use the same brand and model of needle and syringe. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions about the type of syringe you should use. Carefully read the manufacturer’s instructions to learn how to draw insulin into a syringe and inject your dose. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions about how to inject your dose.

If your insulin comes in cartridges, you may need to buy an insulin pen separately. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the type of pen you should use. Carefully read the instructions that come with your pen, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to show you how to use it.

If your insulin comes in a disposable dosing device, read the instructions that come with the device carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist to show you how to use the device. buy insulin online

Insulin chemistry and etymology

Insulin is a protein chain or peptide hormone. There are 51 amino acids in an insulin molecule. It has a molecular weight of 5808 Da.

Insulin is produced in the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. The name insulin comes from the Latin ”insula” for “island” from the cells that produce the hormone in the pancreas. buy insulin online

Insulin’s structure varies slightly between species of animal. Both porcine (from pigs) and bovine (from cows) insulin are similar to human insulin but porcine insulin resembles human insulin more closely.

What does insulin do?

Insulin has several broad actions including:

  • It causes the cells in the liver, muscle, and fat tissue to take up glucose from blood and convert it to glycogen that can be stored in the liver and muscles
  • Insulin also prevents the utilization of fat as an energy source. In absence of insulin or in conditions where insulin is low glucose is not taken up by body cells, and the body begins to use fat as an energy source
  • Insulin also controls other body systems and regulates the amino acid uptake by body cells

How Insulin is Produced

Insulin is produced by the pancreas, a glandlike organ nestled in the curve of the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine) just behind the stomach. The pancreas functions both as an exocrine gland and an endocrine gland.

The exocrine function of the pancreas basically is to help with digestion. It’s in the role as an endocrine gland that the pancreas produces insulin, as well as another hormone called glucagon. buy insulin online

Insulin is produced by specialized beta cells in the pancreas, which are clustered into groups called islets of Langerhans. There are approximately one million islets in a healthy adult pancreas, taking up about 5 percent of the entire organ. (The pancreatic cells that produce glucagon are called alpha cells.) buy insulin online

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